Sample letter to manufacturer to request buyback of defective product

May 17th, 2017

[Your Name]
[Your Mailing Address]
[Your City, CA ZIP Code]
[Your Phone number]

[Your Method of Delivery, such as US Certified Mail, return receipt requested, FedEx, UPS, DHL]

[Manufacturer/Distributor Business Name]
[Mailing address per the Warranty or Owners Manual]
[Manufacturer’s City, State ZIP Code]

[Seller Business Name]
[Seller’s business address]
[Seller’s City, State Zip Code]

Re: [describe the consumer good, such as Year/Make/Model/color/date of purchase]

BUYBACK REQUEST UNDER THE LEMON LAWS WITH ENCLOSURES

To the Management of above Companies:

A copy of my contract/receipt for the above consumer good is enclosed. Please buy it back, as required by your warranty of this product and the California Lemon Law and Commercial Code.

Also enclosed is a copy of my repair orders/invoices for repairs made under the warranty. Essentially, since I purchased this item, it has been repaired [number] times and out of service [number] days. My main concerns are [list briefly the key problems]. The [list of any remaining problems] still have not been fixed after [number] of repair opportunities.

I look forward to your response within 15 days of your receipt. Please advise me of your decision and the steps that you need for me to follow to complete this process, so that I can obtain a prompt refund. If you decide against offering a buyback, please explain your reasoning and provide all documentation why my request was rejected.

Sincerely,

/sign your name/

Enclosures, a copy of:
Purchase contract/receipt
Repair orders/invoices

What difference is there with an attorney or DIY?

February 22nd, 2015

There are plenty of sound reasons to hire a seasoned professional, who has the knowledge, tools, and experience to do the job correctly through to completion. Clearly, others agree with me by their referrals of folks in need of debt collection lawsuit defense or debt settlement. Superior Court dockets around California are flush with money judgments against people who had no legal representation, though the debtor filed documents in the case that he or she believed would prevent a money judgment.

A few people assume that lawyers simply type their new client’s name and case number on a standardized legal form, then pay the court’s fee to file it. Trial could be many months off, so what happens now? Next is the discovery phase, in which both sides get to ask the other for their documents and evidence of the case, to prepare for trial. Lawyers who do these cases are ready, so expect to receive those requests from the debt collection lawyers soon after your response is filed. They can also ask to have you appear in their law office to answer questions under oath at a deposition. Is this something you can handle without an attorney present? You may also expect the debt collection lawyers to file a “motion” stating that you did something incorrectly, which can result in your papers being stricken or you may be ordered to pay more money, known as “monetary sanctions,” to the collection lawyers. If you are fortunate to get to trial, what do you say when the debt collection attorney asks you if this was your debt and if you disputed any of the credit card statements that the judge is reviewing? The knowledge of how to deal with each of these experiences is not learned in school, it is learned by handling these types of cases every day.

Some people believe that they have the same tools as a debt collection defense lawyer uses for taking on a debt collection law firm: a computer, a printer, and the internet. As anyone with a new computer can remind those people, a computer is useless without certain programs and the information those apps require. Even MS Word is a blank slate that needs legal forms in document files, before a lawyer can file it in court. There is also the challenge of representing yourself, when it comes time to serve a document. Serving a legal document must be done by someone who is not party to the lawsuit, which is why a process server, a lawyer and anyone in the law firm can serve legal documents.  Anyone but a party, who is at least age 18.

I cannot imagine someone believing that they have the experience of an attorney who every day represents consumers against debt collection attorneys. Lawyers who rarely handle debt collection cases don’t have the experience to know how much these cases often settle for and which debt collection agencies and creditors settle for less and which demand more. That is why many lawyers who do not handle these cases quote astronomical fees to prospective clients, because they don’t have any idea how much time the case requires and they’d rather not deal in unfamiliar territory. Also, because those lawyers don’t routinely handle debt collect cases, they will take much longer getting papers together and making sure, from start to finish, that key areas have been covered.

When you hire an attorney with the experience handling debt collection cases, you benefit from his or her knowledge, tools and experience, which ends up saving money and reducing the risk of bad outcomes posed by such lawsuits.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler
Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Living Below Radar, Best Time for Hardship Settlement Offer

September 18th, 2013

Question: I am living below the radar, not paying off any debts. I believe that several debt collection lawsuits have been filed against me, which I have ignored. I am not sure if they have gotten judgments against me or not, but there is nothing in my name and all my transactions are in cash, even my income is entirely cash-based. Is there a good time to come out of the shadows and deal with this and, if there is a good time, when and how? Thanks.

My response:
You appear to be following a mish-mash of (a) my “Don’t Pay a Dime Strategy” in which the debtor does not pay the debts in the hope that the creditor or debt buyer will miss the statute of limitations and (b) some other advice you found somewhere commonly referred to as “Judgment Proof.” I am not a fan of your current strategy, because anyone with a house, bank account, or a job that pays more than the minimum wage in California, would not be judgment proof or would be subjected to massive judgments once they get a job, bank account, or real property.

The result is the debtor ends up overpaying to resolve old debts, because the judgment creditor (the person or entity who has a judgment for money) gets a judgment for the full balance, plus accrued interest, court costs, and sometimes attorney’s fees. Defending my clients from debt collection lawsuits has saved my clients so much in most cases. If you’ve ever experienced a small bulb growing into a large flower, you can relate to how these debts blossom and bloom from a simple credit card balance to a default judgment. For the judgment creditor, it’s a sweet smelling, colorful flower. To the judgment debtor, it’s a Venus fly trap!

I have posted several blogs about timely responding when served with a debt collection lawsuit. I have also explained how default judgments are obtained without the debtor knowing about it and what can be done to resolve those old default judgments. I have blogs and legal guides on Avvo.com that explain how to settle and what documentation is essential. Please review my postings, which are organized by several categories.

Great question on when is a good time to settle old debts, including old default judgments. Of course, right now is a great time to settle old debts, especially if the debtor has no assets and very low or no income. When the judgment creditor is unable to collect most or all of the judgment and the debtor could be a candidate for Bankruptcy Chapter 7, that’s when the debtor can propose a “hardship settlement offer,” because they have an actual financial hardship. The offer works best if the debtor has access to additional funds to make an offer that is greater than what their assets and income can provide. For example, since retirement funds are beyond reach of civil judgments, borrowing from a 401-k, a family member, or on an open line of credit, are ways to get the funds for a hardship settlement offer.

How you come out is up to you, but this can be done between the debtor and the debt collection agency directly or the debtor may want to use outside resources. Perhaps there is a family member who is comfortable doing this or hire a debt collection DEFENSE attorney to negotiate. The key is not paying too much for the settlement process, to leave enough to propose an attractive settlement amount. Too little and the debt collector will reject the offer and wait.
Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler
Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Ignoring a Debt Collection Lawsuit That Was Not Personally Delivered

September 10th, 2013

Question: Is it possible a debt collection company can sue the debtor on an unpaid credit card if they have moved to a new address? I have not received the lawsuit papers personally, but I learned from the California Superior court’s online case summary that a debt collection lawsuit has been filed and it states they served me. Can’t I ignore this?

My response:

Yes, the debt collection company can sue for an unpaid debt, even after the debtor moved to a new address, but the lawsuit must be filed in the proper court. In particular, the lawsuit can be filed where the defendant lives when the lawsuit was filed or where the defendant lived when they first entered into the agreement for the credit card.

After that, the debt collection lawsuit must be served in one of the ways permitted by the California Code of Civil Procedure. I explain in other blog postings the two main ways that a defendant can be served in Superior Court on a lawsuit: personal service and substitute service. Substitute service requires a reasonable number of attempts (typically, at least three) at the defendant’s residence or place of business. In your situation, did they try to serve you at your new address or where you work or do business a reasonable number of times? Do they know your new address or did you give that to them at any time?

As the videos on my home page explain, ignoring a debt collection lawsuit is one option of several. I’d recommend exploring carefully each of your options and then call a debt collection DEFENSE attorney (which is what I do) to narrow what options are most appropriate for you and your situation. Putting off dealing with a lawsuit is not suitable for most people, in my opinion.

The way I would compare a defendant’s putting off dealing with a debt collection lawsuit and letting it become a default judgment is that it is similar to not going to the doctor for treatment and anti-biotics of an infected wound. How long before the untreated, festering wound gets worse? How long before the infection spreads and can harm other body parts or even cause the patient to become seriously sick all over?

An unpaid default judgment can be difficult to set aside and is subject to the review by a judge, if after the proper motion is filed. A judge might conclude that the defendant was aware of the judgment and failed to promptly file a response when aware of the lawsuit or promptly file to set aside a default judgment. Thus, an older default judgment becomes almost impossible to set aside and it not only grows with interest at 10 percent per year, but other costs can be added, possibly attorney’s fees. A judgment also impacts, for most people, their personal credit scores for many, many years, making it hard to qualify for credit, property, and sometimes insurance and a job.
Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler
Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Is the worst that can happen being thrown in jail for an unpaid medical debt?

July 5th, 2013

Question: I had to go to the community hospital, as I was really sick and thought I was going to die. I applied for county indigent assistance on my bill and thought that they would take care of it, as I was unemployed. Then I received debt collection calls demanding that I had to pay more than the original bill. I could not pay it, but now I have been sued and they want to also be paid interest and the court costs. What is the worst? Is jail time possible, if I cannot pay?

My Response:

The question of debtors prison and county jail should be the furthest thing from your mind on an unpaid personal debt. When the Constitution was written and ratified by the states, it allowed Congress to provide a safety valve of filing for bankruptcy, as a last resort to discharge most debts for those who qualify. (Article 1, Section 8, Clause 4.) In 1833, federal law eliminated prison for private debts and the states followed. Now, it would be amazing to find an instance where a person is jailed in any state, simply for not being able to pay their personal debts.

Nevertheless, fear of debtor’s prisons are stoked regularly by the news media, even CBS news uses provocative headlines to catch more readers. As recently as 2012, CBS ran a report with the headline: “Jailed for $280: The return of debtors’ prisons.” In fact, the report had nothing to do with the headline. Someone reading the headline would probably believe that not paying a $280 bill or credit card may result in a jail sentence.

Upon reading the entire 2012 CBS News Report, however, it is clear that there is no return of debtors prisons in the USA. The people who were threatened with or spent time in jail were there because they failed to appear in court when ordered, for criminal acts, or they failed to pay court-imposed fines associated with criminal convictions. The other issue in the CBS report was that several states allowed collection charges to be added on top of already expensive court fines.

A judgment is not inevitable if a debt collection lawsuit is filed against an individual, particularly if defended by an experienced debt collection defense attorney, who will handle the case to get it resolved before trial, either by settlement or dismissal. Moreover, even if a money judgment is entered by the court against a person, there are numerous ways to get that judgment resolved and NO chance of jail time, provided that, when so order, the debtor appears in court, answers questions truthfully, and does not commit any criminal acts that are punishable with jail time.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler
Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Should I file bankruptcy to stop end my student loans and daily debt collection calls?

May 8th, 2013

Question: I am unemployed, owe a fortune in student loans, and $2000 in credit cards with two debt collection agencies. I live rent free with my family. There is no way that I can pay $100 per month to settle one of the debts, which is what they want from me to stop calling. Other debt collectors also call me every day. I don’t have the $2000 that a Bankruptcy attorney quoted me.

My response:
Bankruptcy court will approve the discharge of student loans only if you satisfy the “undue hardship” standard, which requires a special procedure to be filed in Bankruptcy Court. That can be expensive and there is no assurance of a favorable outcome. For a large amount of student loans, however, it may be worthwhile if you hire an experienced Bankruptcy Attorney, who evaluates your case and determines that you will likely prevail at such a hearing.

Many federally guaranteed student loans can be discharged in other ways that may have a more favorable standard depending on the circumstances and type of loans. For instance, if you are disabled and the loans are either FFELs, direct, or Perkins loans, you may be qualify for a disability discharge, which merely requires you to file the form, signed by a physician, that you qualify for total and permanent disability, including the medical diagnosis and why this prevents the borrower from working. There is no cost for this application. More information is available online from Student Loan Borrower Assistance and the U.S. Department of Education. There are other statutory loan discharges, such as for a closed school or if the school falsified eligibility. If a statutory discharge is sought and fails, perhaps bankruptcy can be a backup plan.

I have seen debt collection lawsuits filed against my clients for with under $1,000 in principal balance due. I would not assume that this debt collection agency will not sue to enforce either or both of these debts. However, why would they sue you if you are not working and have no assets or income? To file a debt collection lawsuit in California, the debt collection agency must hire a licensed California debt collection attorney, then pay the court’s filing fee and pay to have a process server deliver the documents to each defendant. These costs and fees can be added to the total debt, but if a collection lawsuit pushes the debtor to file bankruptcy or if the debtor is long-term unable to pay, then the debt collection agency has made a poor business decision to invest money on a debt that will not be recovered.

If the debt collection agency waits too long to file a collection lawsuit, then the debt becomes time-barred by the statute of limitations. From that point on, the debt collection agency cannot file a debt collection lawsuit, without risking having the case dismissed as untimely and risking being sued for violating the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA).  The debt collector may not even threaten to file a lawsuit on a time-barred debt, without violating the FDCPA.  Thus, please read my prior blog posting on the “Don’t Pay A Dime Strategy” as an alternative to bankruptcy.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Can a Judgment Lien Stop the Escrow of My House?

March 11th, 2013

Question: I sold my home and it is now in escrow with the buyers. I just learned from the escrow company that an old judgment that I discovered on my credit report years ago must be paid in full with interest, because of a lien that they filed against my house. Is this true and is it legal?

My response:
When a plaintiff wins a judgment for money, such as an unpaid credit card debt, against the defendant, if the judgment is not fully satisfied very soon after entry of judgment, then the judgment creditor’s attorney usually obtains an “Abstract of Judgment,” which is California Judicial Council Enforcement Form # EJ-001 (“Abstract”).

When the Abstract is recorded with the County Recorder or County Clerk’s office, a lien exists over all real property in that county, including a residence. From that point forward (excluding bankruptcy discharge, in many instances), until the judgment is satisfied in full or the judgment creditor records a release of lien, any sale of real property or attempt to refinance property in the name of the judgment debtor(s) becomes an opportunity for the judgment creditor to be paid.

I know of no title company that would insure the title to a property (which is required by the bank for financing a purchase or refinancing), unless all Abstracts that name any of sellers involved are satisfied in full or a release of lien recorded. Buyers also may be unable to obtain real property financing, if they have an outstanding recorded Abstract. Escrow companies facilitate this payoff process by contacting the judgment creditor’s collection attorney for a written payoff demand. When the collection attorney receives this request, they are supposed to compute how much is due and send a letter of the correct amount, including costs and accrued interest. The escrow company then will deduct the appropriate amount and pay this to the creditor’s attorney, who must provide the documentation that can be recorded to show the judgment has been fully satisfied and the Abstract released.

There are some exceptions to this rule, such as the homestead exemption amount ($75,000 or more, depending on the situation of the occupants and owners, such as age or disability). The homestead exemption protects equity when applied towards purchase of another home within six months. See Cal. Code of Civil Procedure, Section 704.720. My blog posting explains the homestead declaration and links to a sample homestead form.

One point about this process is that there is often abuse by the judgment creditor’s attorney.  In particular, there is the temptation to inflate the amount, such as by improperly adding attorney’s fees, demanding excessive fees and costs, and other such nonsense. This might be considered a violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). Obviously, the damages would be the inflated amount, as this is an attempt to collect more than the amount allowed by law. However, inflating the amount could also make it impossible for the Abstract to be satisfied in full, if the amount is so high that the transaction cannot be closed and the judgment creditor is not willing to sign a release of lien. Thus, damages could also be claimed for preventing the sale or refinancing from being completed.

While you might not have time to consider trying to vacate and set aside an old default judgment, especially if you are in the middle of escrow and need to complete that promptly, please read my blog postings about setting aside a default judgement. If the summons and complaint were not properly served on the defendants, the court lacked jurisdiction over the defendant(s), and even an old default judgment can be set aside by a special type of complaint in equity. Here’s one blog posting in particular, that concerns an old default judgment.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Debt Collection Lawsuit for Unpaid Balance of a Car Loan Contract

March 8th, 2013

Question: About three years ago, I was unemployed and did not have enough money to keep paying for the insurance, gas, and installment payments. I contacted the finance company and they told me to surrender my car at the dealership and they would take care of the paperwork. The car was in great condition and I got a notice from the lender after the drop off that they would sell the car at an auction if I did not want the vehicle back. I thought that it would be over, but it wasn’t. They sent me a bill for the unpaid balance, reported it on my credit reports as a repossession, and now they hired a debt collection law firm from Orange County, which is pursing me in court. I was served with the debt collection lawsuit yesterday.

My response:
Please review my legal guide on Avvo.com which explains the California consumer’s rights following repossession of a motor vehicle. The fact that you took it yourself to the dealership and voluntarily surrendered it during business hours rather than have a repo agent come to your home at night to seize it does not change the fact that it was a repossession and the finance company’s duty to give you proper notice before they may sell the vehicle at auction or private sale. Essentially, before the finance company may sell the vehicle and then have the right to the unpaid balance, they must send you a proper notice of intent to sell or dispose and then perform the sale in a commercially reasonable manner. More details are in my repossession legal guide.

Once you have an idea of the substantive law regarding repossession from my legal guide, now you can review my blog on your options and the civil procedure for defending a debt collection lawsuit, in my “Next Steps” blog posting. That blog posting provides guidance on the defendant’s options when receiving a debt collection lawsuit and how much time is appropriate to avoid a default judgment, as some people confuse a hearing date with the due date for a proper, written response. Usually, the defendant has 30 days to file the defense papers in court from date of personal service by a process server.

To reduce the risk of losing and a money judgment entered against you, I’d recommend hiring an experienced consumer attorney who handles debt collection lawsuit defense. Most of these cases are settled or dismissed, once the consumer and his or her lawyer see what documents the debt collection law firm has or is missing. Sometimes the notice of intent was missing a required disclosure or the amounts were not correctly stated or the vehicle was not sold in a commercially reasonable manner. These are challenging arguments to present in court and not for the do-it-yourself types, even if you’ve been in a courtroom before.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

I was just served with a credit card collection lawsuit. Now what?

March 4th, 2013

Question: I stopped paying on my credit card a while back, because I was tired of paying a high interest rate and I did not have enough money to pay it all off. I sort of suspected that this debt would be sold to a debt collection agency for pennies on the dollar, but the papers are asking for me to pay the full balance, plus the high interest rate that I thought I was going to avoid. I contacted the company and they are holding firm on that number. I don’t have the money for this and my income is too high to qualify for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

My response:
First, please check out the short videos on my home page. The first video is a quick overview of all options that are possible to the situation of being served with a debt collection lawsuit. That will help you narrow down your options to the one or two that suit your situation and your own preferences. Your posting did not specify what bank had the original credit card or when you last paid it, which will help determine if they filed the lawsuit after the statute of limitations period had expired. That is very important in these cases and makes a big difference.

I’d then suggest reading my blog posting on the defendant’s Next Steps when the consumer has been sued in a debt collection lawsuit on a defaulted credit card. That blog explains how much time is appropriate to avoid a default judgment, as some people confuse a hearing date with the due date for a proper, written response. If you want to defend this lawsuit and have a good chance to settle for much less or possibly get the case dismissed, do not miss the deadline for filing a response or having a lawyer do this for you. It is usually 30 days from the date of being personally served, but please don’t wait for the last minute.

I don’t suggest that consumers or non-litigation attorneys try to handle the lawsuit defense for themselves, as I have seen too many people either pay way more than they should to settle with the debt collection law firm or they file papers with the court, which get stricken as being defective or improperly admit most or all of the debt collection lawsuit. Almost as bad, is when the debt collection lawyers press the case very hard against the defendant, using court procedures and formal discovery requests to overcome the defendant’s attempt to get the case to trial. I have some of these as PDFs on my website, in the Case Examples tab.

To avoid the risk of losing a money judgment for the full balance in the lawsuit plus accrued interest, I urge you to contact an experienced consumer attorney, who regularly handles debt collection lawsuit defense. An experienced attorney should be able to help negotiate a satisfactory settlement or get the case dismissed, depending on the admissible evidence that the debt collection law firm can obtain or not obtain.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer

Living Paycheck to Paycheck, Debt Collector Wants Too Much to Settle

February 18th, 2013

Question: Like so many others in this economy, I can barely pay my current bills, so I had to stop paying the minimum on some of my credit cards. The phone calls and final notices for payment from the banks stopped about a year ago, but I just received a letter with a settlement offer from a debt collection company, which also says that I can dispute the debt within 30 days of receipt. What do you suggest? At the end of the month, there is still nothing left over, after regular expenses, living as cheap as we can. I cannot pay the settlement, but I am afraid their next move will be to sue me in court, like your website says. My wages are higher than the bankruptcy means test amount, so I need help.

My response:
As you know, you are not alone. Now, 41% of Americans live each week paycheck to paycheck, according to a recent survey by Allstate, covered in the LA Times Business/Money Section. After several months of no credit card payments, the bank charged off your account as a bad debt. A charge off is an accounting term to show that the debt is probably not collectable, so bank auditors will no longer allow this to be considered an asset of the institution.

At that point, the credit card bank reviewed its uncollectable accounts and sold many of them to a debt collection agency, known in the industry as a “debt buyer.” Either this debt collection agency or another debt collector is now contacting you to settle this debt, which now belongs to them. If you do not settle soon, they may refer the debt to a collection lawyer licensed in California, who will probably file a lawsuit in the Superior Court that covers where you live, if settlement arrangements are not made in writing. I explain the reasons in an article on my website, Understanding Why You Were Sued.

It can be less costly for the consumer to settle when no lawsuit has been filed and the lawyer has not been retained, because the debt buyer has not paid for those costs and fees. However, depending on the debt buyer’s policies, it still may be unaffordable or you may feel that they want too much to settle the debt, which did not cost them much to buy. Bear in mind, however, that if they sue you in court and win a money judgment, the amount will probably be the full balance on one of your last statements, plus accrued interest, court costs, and maybe attorney’s fees. The judgment may then appear on your credit reports and be secured as a lien on any real property (such as your home) by recording an abstract of judgment with the County Clerk or Recorder’s Office. There are numerous other ways that the collection agency’s lawyers can enforce this debt, such as by levying the consumer’s bank account and wage garnishment.

As painful as a settlement would be now, a worse alternative is having to pay this entire account plus interest and attorney’s fees on a money judgment that itself yields 10% interest per year and many costs can be added to the balance. By the same token, I would not accept any settlement offer that the consumer cannot ensure will be paid, exactly as promised. This would only put you in a worse position, as the discount that you negotiated in the settlement will be lost and the payments will merely be applied as credits towards the full balance due.

When agreeing to a debt collection settlement, you as the debtor should know that the collection agency will require you to acknowledge in writing the full balance due. If you miss one or more of the settlement payments, then they will have a much easier time enforcing in court the full unpaid amount of the debt. This would not limited by the settlement amount. This lawsuit would also not be limited by the fact that some debt buyers lack adequate documentation of their debts and it can challenging to obtain the full records for the account.

Your question also asked about a written dispute, because the debt collection letter states that you have the right to get it verified in writing or to dispute it. You may want to access the free consumer letters on my other web site, sample letter #1.1, which contains the language that I recommend for this purpose. Be prepared, however, for a simple letter back from the debt collection agency that says we have verified it. There are court cases that make this an adequate verification of the debt, so they can continue their collection efforts. I am not aware of potential harm from sending the dispute letter, but asking them to verify the debt in writing can make them more “aware” of you.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoCalConsumerLawyer