Posts Tagged ‘judgment expires’

Never Served, but Now Something Came by Mail, a Request for Entry of Default Judgment

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

Question:
What does it mean when the collection lawyers sent me a Request for Entry of Default Judgment? The only thing that I received from this law firm before now were a couple of letters, which I did not call back, because I didn’t have money to settle.  The papers show they have filed a lawsuit in the courthouse near me, which the online case summary shows they claim they served the summons and complaint by mail on me a couple of months ago. I thought that the law requires personal service of lawsuits, something called “due process”?

My response:
You are correct, there is a Constitutional principle known as Due Process, which requires that a defendant be given notice of a pending lawsuit, preferably by personal service on the defendant. However, California civil procedure permits alternative forms of service, if the process server declares that they tried several times to serve you personally at home or at work, but you were never present.  This is known as due diligence.  After due diligence, they can hand the summons and complaint to someone who is an adult at the defendant’s house or apparently in charge at your workplace and then mail a copy to you at that address.  This is known a substitute service.

If you have been substitute served, rather than the usual 30 days to respond in writing to the lawsuit, California civil procedure adds 10 days from the date of mailing, giving you or your defense attorney a total of 40 days from date of mailing to file in court your response.  One point about substitute service: it must be delivered to someone at your residence or work address, or it is invalid and can be challenged, but act promptly and consult with experienced counsel on that, as there is no standard DIY form to set aside a default judgment.

Now that a couple of months have passed since the process server said he or she substitute served you, the debt collection lawyers have sent you a copy of the Request for Entry of Default, which they have also probably sent to the Clerk of the Court to be filed.  If the Clerk files it, then it becomes an enforceable judgment against you, unless you set aside the default judgment, satisfy the default judgment by paying money to settle in full with the plaintiff, or file bankruptcy to have it discharged.

A California judgment must be renewed every 10 years, or it expires, but many collection agencies keep track of judgment expiration dates and renew it until satisfied in full or discharged in bankruptcy.  Thus, I would suggest you deal with it now, if possible, as it can remain out there forever and pop up and be very annoying and vexing at the most inconvenient times.

Robert Stempler
www.StopCollectionLawsuits.com
Twitter @RStempler